Review: I'll Meet You There (Heather Demetrios)

The Deets: 

Audience: YA
Pages: 400
Publisher: February 3rd 2015 by Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
ISBN: 9780805097955
Genre: contemporary
Source: eARC




I'll Meet You ThereIf seventeen-year-old Skylar Evans were a typical Creek View girl, her future would involve a double-wide trailer, a baby on her hip, and the graveyard shift at Taco Bell. But after graduation, the only thing standing between straightedge Skylar and art school are three minimum-wage months of summer. Skylar can taste the freedom—that is, until her mother loses her job and everything starts coming apart. Torn between her dreams and the people she loves, Skylar realizes everything she’s ever worked for is on the line.

Nineteen-year-old Josh Mitchell had a different ticket out of Creek View: the Marines. But after his leg is blown off in Afghanistan, he returns home, a shell of the cocksure boy he used to be. What brings Skylar and Josh together is working at the Paradise—a quirky motel off California’s dusty Highway 99. Despite their differences, their shared isolation turns into an unexpected friendship and soon, something deeper.


























You will either love or hate this book, but I'm pretty sure you're going to love it. It's really hard not to.I mean really, really, really hard not to.

At first I figured I was getting myself into a typical contemporary fiction read. The opening scene was a bit ho-hum and felt cliche to me. You know the scene: good girl at a party full of underaged drinking with her loose best friend and the best guy friend that is a social outcast. I will admit that I almost gave up on the book right then because I was afraid it was not going to be original (and I'm not a huge contemporary fan anyway). But then Josh appeared. I still wasn't sold, but I decided to give the book one more chapter to see what might happen.

This story is told in alternating points of view. You get a bit of Skylar, then a glimpse of Josh. Josh's story is really complicated since the majority of it deals with flashfacks to his tour in Afghanistan. I do not know the author's experience with PTSD, but Josh's story was so raw that at times I could hardly breathe. My eyes tear up just writing about it.

Do not give up on this book. Do not try to box it into a category you think you know. Do not make my original hasty assumptions. I'll Take You There really surprised me. I can now saw I love everything about this book. The characters are deeply flawed and layered. I found surprises on every page. I truly think Heather Demetrios did a fantastic job of showing characters at their best and worst. The struggles they each went through are real. So real, in fact, that your heart will ache for them.

I'll Take You There is far more than a contemporary read or a book about finding romance in an unexpected place. It's a story about forgiving yourself and taking chances.It's a book worth reading.


One Minute Rundown : Ghosts of Heaven (Marcus Sedgwick)

The Deets: 
Audience: older readers, YA
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781626721258
Publisher: January 6th 2015 by Roaring Brook Press
Genre: short stories
Source: e-ARC from Netgalley









The Ghosts of HeavenA bold, genre-bending epic that chronicles madness, obsession, and creation, from the Paleolithic era through the Witch Hunts and into the space-bound future.

Four linked stories boldly chronicle madness, obsession, and creation through the ages. Beginning with the cave-drawings of a young girl on the brink of creating the earliest form of writing, Sedgwick traverses history, plunging into the seventeenth century witch hunts and a 1920s insane asylum where a mad poet's obsession with spirals seems to be about to unhinge the world of the doctor trying to save him. Sedgwick moves beyond the boundaries of historical fiction and into the future in the book's final section, set upon a spaceship voyaging to settle another world for the first time. Merging Sedgwick's gift for suspense with science- and historical-fiction, Ghosts of Heaven is a tale is worthy of intense obsession. 




 



Sometimes there are books that go beyond words. The Ghosts of Heaven is certainly one of those books.  

I honestly cannot even tell you what I thought of this book. It was both bizarre and poetic at the same time. I wanted to love and hate it instantaneously. So many emotions were stirred within these pages. 

I don't think I would consider this a light read. It's not fluffy by any means. I found myself reading one story at a time and pondering the events at each ending. When you read this book, don't come looking for happy endings either. You won't find them. Instead, you'll find humanity's darkest corners lurking. 

There is a lot to discuss in each story, and I could easily see this being a book club pick. Or, the stories could be used to spark a very interesting discussion on human nature. (I'm thinking in line with Lord of the Flies, here.)


Blog Tour for COUNTDOWN ZERO (The Codename Conspiracy #2) by Chris Rylander

The Deets: 

Audience: middle grades
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780062120113
Publisher:  February 3rd 2015 by Walden Pond Press
Genre: action/adventure
Source: publisher provided ARC in exchange for honest review





Countdown Zero (The Codename Conspiracy #2)From Chris Rylander, author of the breakout hit Fourth Stall saga, comes the second book in the Codename Conspiracy series, an incredibly funny and clever mash-up of middle grade school story and spy adventure.

Ever since Carson Fender was let go by the secret agency that had enlisted his services to help foil a nefarious plot perpetrated by one of their former agents, he's been back to hanging with his friends, pulling pranks, and not having to lie to everyone about how he's spending his days. And that's for the best, isn't it?

Of course, this was all before a note showed up in his school lunch, informing him that Agent Nineteen had three days left to live, and that there might still be someone inside the Agency working against them. Carson has always been able to rely on his friends--but what happens when there's no one left to trust?















In a nutshell The Codename Conspiracy series is James Bond for kids. It is packed with secret agents and double agents; plot twists and miscues; narrow escapes and plenty of peril. It is the perfect book for a reader that adores action and adventure.

Countdown Zero continues Carson's story from the first book in the series, Codename Zero. This time, however, he has to save on of his former partners. Danger lurks at every corner, and Carson has plenty of tough choices to make.

My biggest take away from the book was Carson himself. He was maturing at a rate that might have been a bit faster than his friends. Pranks were becoming childish, but yet he's still a kid. His double life creates many situations that he wishes to share with his friends. Unfortunately, he cannot do that because he doesn't want to endanger their lives. That leaves him a bit lonely and frustrated at times. I could appreciate his struggle. It's not easy carrying a secret that you want to share with those closest to you but can't. Anyone that has found themselves in that situation-- or one similar to it-- will be able to relate. You'll also be able to relate to Carson's voice. He is super witty and observant. I do not know what it's like to be a young boy, but I'd imagine his thoughts are spot on. The way he describes the people he encounters and the situations he finds himself in are hysterical. Of course, that could be because I have the sense of humor of a middle school student.

There is plenty to find in the books that will intrigue younger readers. If you have a fan of adventure stories that enjoys a likeable and believable (albeit a child spy) main character, definitely check out Countdown Zero.



Author Bio: 




Chris Rylander is the author of the Fourth Stall Saga and the Codename Conspiracy series.  A fan of brown shipping boxes turned on their sides, dance-offs to win a girl's heart, and rice, he lives in Chicago.  You can visit him online at www.chrisrylander.com and on Twitter






Oh, there is a giveaway too! I'll make it super easy to enter this one. :)
a Rafflecopter giveaway
Displaying Countdown Zero Blog Tour Banner.jpg



Guest Post and Blog Tour: One Witch at a Time ( Stacy DeKeyser)


The Deets: 
Audience: middle grades
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781481413510
Publisher: February 10th 2015 by Simon & Schuster
Genre: fantasy; fairy tale
Source: copy in exchange for honest review by publisher





One Witch at a Time 
Misplaced magic is trouble.

The day had started so well. But now here was Rudi, racing home to intercept a thief. All because of a foolish bargain made by a nine-year-old girl.

Trouble has returned to Brixen, and once again, Rudi is the one who must make things right. Can he undo the disaster caused when an unsuspecting stranger brings a foreign witch's magic into the Brixen Witch's province?






Displaying Stacy DeKeyser photo_credit Michaela Ristaino_new.jpg
Stacy DeKeyser is the author of The Brixen Witch, which received two starred reviews and was a Chicago Public Library Best of the Best Pick, and its sequel, One Witch at a Time, as well as the young adult novel, Jump the Cracks and two nonfiction books for young readers. She lives in Connecticut with her family. To learn more and to download a free, CCSS-aligned discussion guide, visit StacyDeKeyser.com. 
Find out more about the author on her website and Twitter





Today is a pretty special day because the author has stopped by to share her thoughts on writing!





A Secret about Writing Advice: I Don’t Think It Means What You Think It Does.





There’s a ton of writing advice out there, and I’ve tried it all. Some of it is helpful. A lot of it misses the mark, despite good intentions. Lots of advice about writing makes me think of a quote from William Goldman’s book, The Princess Bride: “I don’t think it means what you think it does.” Here are 5 of the most commonly misunderstood pieces of writing advice, and what they really mean:





1. Keep a journal.



So you can jot down ideas, or scraps of dialog, or an interesting name, before you forget them. (A corollary to this is “keep a notepad and pen next to your bed.”) I’ve tried all this. Failed badly, because (a) I am usually too lazy or sleepy to bother and (b) when I do bother, I lose the journal, or can’t read my notes the next morning.



What it Really Means: Pay attention. To everything. And put your observations into words, even if it’s just in your head. How the blossoms of a mountain laurel look like tiny peppermint candies. How a full moon on a snowy night is so bright, you have to peek out the window to see if someone left the yard light on. With practice, the really intriguing ideas will stay with you, even if you don’t write them down.



2. Let your characters “speak to you.”



Whenever I hear an author say this, I want to ask her if she’s feeling OK. Do her characters literally whisper in her ear, like little fairies sitting on her shoulder? And if they do, shouldn’t she be worried? Of course, I'm only half-kidding; I know that writers who say this are speaking metaphorically. But I don't think they need to.



What it Really Means: I have no idea what this means, actually. You’re the one writing the book. And it’s hard work! Go ahead and take the credit.



3. Interview your characters.



And write it all down in dialogue form. Or make lists: What your characters are carrying in their pockets; favorite foods; most traumatizing childhood experience, etc. etc. etc.



This kind of thing sounds so boring and Not Fun that it makes me shudder. Don’t get me wrong: I write pages and pages of background information and research notes. But it’s a pretty loose and follow-your-nose kind of process. If I ever had to sit down and write out detailed character sketches, I think I’d give up writing for good.



What it Really Means: Know your characters, absolutely. But just like real people, you might have to get to know them a little at a time.



4. Write every day.



I wish! But life gets in the way sometimes. If it does, I try not to beat myself up over it. I take a step back and let the story simmer a bit. Do a little of that paying attention to the world around me. Or I think about my characters, and how they’ve interacted so far, and I ask myself why, and I learn a little more about them. Even when I don’t actually write a word.



What it Really Means: Writing is not always about putting words on the page. Let your story and characters roam around in your head even when you’re away from your keyboard.





5. Read widely in the genre you want to write.



Well, yes and no. I read as much middle grade fiction as I can, including the type of real-world-based fantasy that I like to write. But to be honest, I haven’t read many fairy tale adaptations, and I never read fantasy when I’m in the middle of writing it. I don’t want to be influenced by other books. I want to give my own ideas room to grow.



What it Really Means: Read widely. That’s it. The more you read, the better a writer you’ll be. I totally believe in learning by osmosis.



Many of my writer friends might disagree with me—and that’s OK. We all have to discover what writing advice really means. 
















Mini-review: One Witch at a Time (Stacy DeKeyser)



The Deets: 
Audience: middle grades
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781481413510
Publisher: February 10th 2015 by Simon & Schuster
Genre: fantasy; fairy tale
Source: copy in exchange for honest review by publisher










One Witch at a Time 
Misplaced magic is trouble.


The day had started so well. But now here was Rudi, racing home to intercept a thief. All because of a foolish bargain made by a nine-year-old girl.


Trouble has returned to Brixen, and once again, Rudi is the one who must make things right. Can he undo the disaster caused when an unsuspecting stranger brings a foreign witch's magic into the Brixen Witch's province?














Fans of fairy tale re-imaginings rejoice! This book will have everything you're looking for: new characters, familiar plots, and plenty of twists.


At its heart, Rudi finds himself in a grand adventure trying to save his village from 'bad' magic. He's also saddled with watching out for a younger girl that may prove herself to be rather useful.


There is definitely a good bit of familiarity with the story since it has a Fe-Fi-Foing giant and a beanstalk. That might be where the similarities end, however. The settings are unique and very well developed. Jack and Rudi have very little in common, with Rudi being much more likeable. The Brixen Witch herself is a mystery. I'd really like to read The Brixen Witch (Pied Pier retelling) to know more about this witch and the town of Brixen.


While One Witch at a Time can be read as a stand alone, I do think it would make since to read The Brixen Witch first. I can tell there is a bit of history missing for those that only read the companion novel. Since I fall into that category, I was glad to know I wasn't completely lost. The author does a smashing job of building back story without weighing the new tale down.


One Witch at a Time was a fast read full of adventure. It would appeal to younger readers the most, but they should enjoy it as much as any adult that loves a good retelling.

Mini-Review: One of the Guys (Lisa Aldin)

The Deets: 

Audience: YA
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781939392633
Publisher: February 10th 2015 by Spencer Hill Press
Genre: contemporary, coming of age
Source: e-ARC from Netgalley






One of the GuysTomboy to the core, Toni Valentine understands guys. She'll take horror movies, monster hunts and burping contests over manicures. So Toni is horrified when she's sent to the Winston Academy for Girls, where she has to wear a skirt and learn to be a lady while the guys move on without her.

Then Toni meets Emma Elizabeth, a girl at school with boy troubles, and she volunteers one of her friends as a pretend date. Word spreads of Toni’s connections with boys, and she discovers that her new wealthy female classmates will pay big money for fake dates. Looking for a way to connect her old best friends with her new life at school, Toni and Emma start up Toni Valentine’s Rent-A-Gent Service.
But the business meets a scandal when Toni falls for one of her friends--the same guy who happens to be the most sought-after date. With everything she's built on the line, Toni has to decide if she wants to save the business and her old life, or let go of being one of the guys for a chance at love.























I must be in a contemporary/ romance sort of mood, because One of the Guys is the second contemporary book I've read in a row.  I would classify this one in the "beach read" category, though. It was a very quick read with a few moments of humor, but I really felt it lacked much else.

Within the first few pages, I could tell that Toni was all about Loch. It was so obvious. I felt the lake monster hunting was a bit lame for a group of teenagers going into senior year of high school, but I kept reading.

Toni was a fun character when she paired up with Emma Elizabeth. Their shenanigans at Winston Academy (and beyond) lead to some pretty interesting situations for all characters involved. On her own, however, was just so-so. She's definitely a tomboy, but it felt off. She is resistant to Winston Academy and everything it stands for, but then proclaims she wants to be a girly girl. I didn't really buy it. Nothing about her actions in this book made me think she wanted lipstick and skirts.

 My favorite characters-- by far-- in the book are the boys. Each one is very different and has inner demons to overcome. You have super nervous boy that is head over heels with a girl he's scared to approach. Adorable. Then there is super angsty boy that blames everyone else for his problems. He's a bit annoying, but luckily he's minor in the plot overall. You just have to put up with his loathing and jerkiness at a few points in the story.  Finally, you have mega nerd monster hunter boy that doesn't know he's pretty cute. He was pretty solid in his role of best-friend-that-happens-to-be-a-guy.

As I'm writing this, I wish I could come up with something that really stands out to me in this book. But I can't. One of the Guys reads more like a journal of a high school girl than a YA novel. There is nothing that indicates "diary" by any means, but there are some pretty large gaps that just get skipped over. That's what gives me the diary vibe. It's as if Toni is telling her story and leaving out anything that she doesn't want to discuss in detail.

I won't say I disliked it or that I'm sad I read it. It was ok, and I flew through the pages. It's a good book to read if you have it around and nothing else is speaking to you. Light and fluffy and nothing heavy in this one. But I would almost guarantee that teenage girls would eat this up, especially if they have crushes on their guy friends.  

Mini- Review: Breathe. Annie, Breathe (Miranda Kenneally)

The Deets:

Audience: YA
Pages: 306
Publisher: July 15th 2014 by Sourcebooks Fire
ISBN: 9781402284793
Genre: contemporary




Breathe, Annie, BreatheAnnie hates running. No matter how far she jogs, she can’t escape the guilt that if she hadn’t broken up with Kyle, he might still be alive. So to honor his memory, she starts preparing for the marathon he intended to race.

But the training is even more grueling than Annie could have imagined. Despite her coaching, she’s at war with her body, her mind—and her heart. With every mile that athletic Jeremiah cheers her on, she grows more conflicted. She wants to run into his arms…and sprint in the opposite direction. For Annie, opening up to love again may be even more of a challenge than crossing the finish line.






I'm not sure why Breathe, Annie, Breathe caught my attention. I'm not a fan of contemporary fiction, so that couldn't be it. Maybe it's because I hate running, and a character that feels the same way spoke to me? Regardless, I picked up Breathe, Annie, Breathe and ran with it.

Annie's voice is easy to relate to. She's devastated by the death of her long-term boyfriend, and absolutely racked with guilt. One unfortunate event has her thinking about the 'what ifs' and paralyzed by her sense of loss.

The start of the book mirrored the beginning of a running program: it has spurts of energy, then lagged to catch its breath. But like a good runner would do, I stuck with it. As soon as Jeremiah crossed Annie's path, I was hooked. He was a mystery and I wanted to discover his secrets right along with Annie.

To be very honest, I think Jeremiah's story was the most interesting for me. Annie took the role of a secondary character because I really didn't care about her running struggles. I wanted to know why Jeremiah was so broken and flighty. He had a lot more depth than Annie, in my opinion. But to be fair, when Annie and Jeremiah interacted with one another, there were sparks and the story seemed to merge into one fluid path. Both needed something but didn't know how to cross the red ribbon to find healing.

For me, the ending wrapped up too quickly. As soon as Annie graduated high school it was like BAM! college life. That could have been a separate book easily, but I do see what the author was doing. The linear time period wasn't defined by a school year or calendar; instead, it was paced based on the time it would take to train for and run a marathon.

Overall, Breathe, Annie, Breathe was a quick read that had some emotional parts to give you the feels. There was enough sarcasm between the main characters to make you smile and believe their attraction (and resistance to it). If you want a break from your genre of choice, Breath, Annie, Breathe is a nice way to deviate from your normal path.



Read an excerpt: http://mirandakenneally.com/writing/e...

Interview with Sarah Beth Durst

I am thrilled to have the opportunity to ask one of my all-time favorite authors questions about her recently released book, Chasing Power. If you haven't had a chance to read it, you can check out my review HERE

The delightful Sarah Beth Durst was kind enough to answer some of my questions about her book (and a few random thoughts I had as well).


The book

I LOVE how each of your books is so unique. I never feel like I’m reading the same book twice.
How does writing a YA novel differ from writing an adult novel?


Thanks so much!

Some things are the same: You flail around for a little while until you find the character's voice, and then you try to tell the story through that voice as faithfully as you can.

The difference is entirely in what that voice is.  The difference between your characters -- their experience, how they see the world, how they see themselves -- is what shapes the stories.  Every time you write through a different person's eyes, you see the world differently and so you tell a different story.  Write through the eyes of a sixteen-year-old, and the result is a YA novel.  Write through the eyes of a twenty-eight-year-old, and you have a novel for adults.

What kind of novel is CHASING POWER?

I always write fantasy.  (I blame my childhood for this.  Hours spent pretending I had a magic wand,
searching for an entrance to Narnia, and exploring the woods in search of elves.)  But within that genre, I like to hop around a lot and play with all the subgenres.  CHASING POWER is an Indiana-Jones-style adventure about Kayla, girl with the power to move things with her mind, and Daniel, a boy who can teleport -- and who lies as easily as he travels.

Above all else, I wanted this novel to be a fun ride.  I want the reader to hop in the roller coaster car
next to Kayla and ride with her up, down, and around the curves.

The Process

What is one thing you wished you knew about the writing process when you started writing your very first novel?

I wish I knew that you don't need to wait for inspiration.  If you sit at your desk, day after day, and string together sentences... the muse will come find you.

I also wish I knew that you don't need to wait until you have time.  Life is always busy.  There are always interruptions and distractions.  It's rare to find those lovely stretches of free time -- in fact, I'd argue that consistent free time is a myth.  You need to steal bits of time.  It is possible to write in only ten minutes with the TV blaring in the background.

What advice do you have for aspiring writers?

Write every day.  (Note: this advice doesn't work for everyone.)  If you write every day, even if it's only for five minutes, then writing ceases to become this daunting task.  Make writing as much a part of your daily life as brushing your teeth.

The Fun Stuff

Would you rather live in a world where people could breathe underwater or where animals could
speak?


Breathe underwater, because then no one would ever drown again.

(But talking animals are indeed AWESOME.  Especially if they're smart and aren't just saying, "Food! Food!  Food!" all day long.)

What’s your favorite fairy tale character and why?

Ooh, good question.  Favorite fairy tale is Beauty and the Beast (because they become friends before

they fall in love -- also, because in BEAUTY by Robin McKinley and in the Disney version, Beast gives her a library).  But favorite character?  I'd have to go with the fairy godmother.  She has such potential for changing the world, for good or ill.  Unlike the heroes and heroines, things don't just happen to the fairy godmother; she makes things happen.

Thanks so much for interviewing me!



I really hope you all enjoyed getting some insight into the brilliant mind behind Chasing Power (and my other favorites: Drink, Slay, Love;  Vessel; and Into the Wild). I can't wait to see what she has in store for us with her newest novels Fire and Heist and The Girl Who Could Not Dream.

Review: For Darkness Shows the Stars (Diana Peterfreund)

The Deets:

Audience: anyone
Pages: 407
Publisher: June 12th 2012 by Balzer + Bray
ISBN: 9780062006141
Genre: retelling, sci-fi, romance
Source: library copy


For Darkness Shows the Stars (For Darkness Shows the Stars, #1)It's been several generations since a genetic experiment gone wrong caused the Reduction, decimating humanity and giving rise to a Luddite nobility who outlawed most technology.

Elliot North has always known her place in this world. Four years ago Elliot refused to run away with her childhood sweetheart, the servant Kai, choosing duty to her family's estate over love. Since then the world has changed: a new class of Post-Reductionists is jumpstarting the wheel of progress, and Elliot's estate is foundering, forcing her to rent land to the mysterious Cloud Fleet, a group of shipbuilders that includes renowned explorer Captain Malakai Wentforth--an almost unrecognizable Kai. And while Elliot wonders if this could be their second chance, Kai seems determined to show Elliot exactly what she gave up when she let him go.

But Elliot soon discovers her old friend carries a secret--one that could change their society . . . or bring it to its knees. And again, she's faced with a choice: cling to what she's been raised to believe, or cast her lot with the only boy she's ever loved, even if she's lost him forever.

Inspired by Jane Austen's Persuasion, For Darkness Shows the Stars is a breathtaking romance about opening your mind to the future and your heart to the one person you know can break it.


This book.

 Sigh.

I am such a fan of retellings. Especially modern retellings of my old favorites. I just absolutely adored this book. It was one part Persuasion and one part sci-fi romance. (and I do NOT like sci-fi books.)

For fans of Persuasion (that won't nitpick every detail), you'll be pleased with what the author has done. The main characters are loyal to their original Austen roles. The trade mark misunderstandings are also in place. There are a few differences that really make this book its own, and not just a copy cat.

For instance, the idea of this man-made plague type disease that destroyed humanity is obviously not Austen. Elliot is a bit more outspoken than her Austen character would be as well. And Kai? Well, Kai is Wentworth. Period.

There isn't much I could say because the plot really does follow the plot of Persuasion. The setting is uniquely its own, which really won me over. It wasn't over the top sci-fi (thank goodness), but it did have a few elements that would appease sci-fi fans. My only gripe is how quickly the ending wrapped up. The psycho father was ushered out of the picture with only a mild fight, and things became all rosy for Elliot in the matter of pages. That felt a bit rushed given the circumstances. I also got a bit annoyed by the letters from a younger Elliot and Kai that kept popping up. I eventually just stopped reading them because I didn't feel like they added much to the story.

 I really want to check out the remaining books in the series, but they don't seem to feature the same characters which is a big disappointment for me too. I really want to know what happens for Elliot and Kai.

Mini-review: Killer Instinct (The Naturals #2) by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

The Deets: 

Audience: YA
Pages: 386
Publisher: November 4th 2014 by Disney-Hyperion
ISBN: 9781423168324
Genre: mystery, forensic thriller
Source: eARC from Netgalley




Killer Instinct (The Naturals, #2)Seventeen-year-old Cassie Hobbes has a gift for profiling people. Her talent has landed her a spot in an elite FBI program for teens with innate crime-solving abilities, and into some harrowing situations. After barely escaping a confrontation with an unbalanced killer obsessed with her mother’s murder, Cassie hopes she and the rest of the team can stick to solving cold cases from a distance.

But when victims of a brutal new serial killer start turning up, the Naturals are pulled into an active case that strikes too close to home: the killer is a perfect copycat of Dean’s incarcerated father—a man he’d do anything to forget. Forced deeper into a murderer’s psyche than ever before, will the Naturals be able to outsmart the enigmatic killer’s brutal mind games before this copycat twists them into his web for good?

With her trademark wit, brilliant plotting, and twists that no one will see coming, Jennifer Lynn Barnes will keep readers on the edge of their seats (and looking over their shoulders) as they race through the pages of this thrilling novel.

























I'm not going to pretend and say this is the type of book I like to read. I'm a big baby with a very active imagination. It does not take much to work me up into a gigantic ball of crazy. Sleepless nights aside, I love this series!

The Naturals had me on the edge of my seat with every turn of the page. The twist at the end left me speechless. When I saw that book two was on its way, I knew I had to read it. I had very high hopes for Killer Instinct, and I was not disappointed (much).

If you're looking for a twist, you'll find it. This one had a bit more complications along the way than its predecessor. Although, I figured out the grand mystery before the big reveal. (To be honest, I was led astray once THEN figured it out.)

You'll also find a good sprinkling of gore. It's not over the top, but it made me read a bit quicker at times. (Super wuss, I am) My only complaint with this book is the on and off romance triangle. Jennifer Lynn Barnes did such a fantastic job of making both love interests so darn likeable that I just couldn't choose. I'm still conflicted. To be honest, I want an alternate ending so I can have both-- just in case I change my mind later on. I wasn't completely satisfied with the end result because it felt like one of those "not an option, option". Kind of like how Katniss ends up with Peeta because there is no one else for Peeta and Gale turned into a creep. Not really an option there.

The romance factor didn't distract from the book much, luckily. Cassie can be a bit wishy washy, but her role in the book still focuses on solving mysteries before she gets killed. It makes for a very fast-paced read!






 photo 4-star.gif

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Grab my Button

Flashlight Reader

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

2015 Reading Challenge

2015 Reading Challenge
Alanna (The Flashlight Reader) has read 0 books toward her goal of 100 books.
hide

Rating System

Rating System

Blog Roll

Pageviews