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Review: Queen Elizabeth, Vampire Slayer (Lucy Weston)

The Secret History of Elizabeth Tudor, Vampire Slayer
Lucy Weston
Sovereign Power. Eternal Pleasure.
  Revealed at last in this new vampire saga for the ages: the true, untold story of the “Virgin Queen” and her secret war against the Vampire King of England. . . .
  On the eve of her coronation, Elizabeth Tudor is summoned to the tomb of her mother, Anne Boleyn, to learn the truth about her bloodline—and her destiny as a Slayer. Born to battle the bloodsucking fiends who ravage the night, and sworn to defend her beloved realm against all enemies, Elizabeth soon finds herself stalked by the most dangerous and seductive vampire of all.
  He is Mordred, bastard son of King Arthur, who sold his soul to destroy his father. After centuries in hiding, he has arisen determined to claim the young Elizabeth as his Queen. Luring her into his world of eternal night, Mordred tempts Elizabeth with the promise of everlasting youth and beauty, and vows to protect her from all enemies. Together, they will rule over a golden age for vampires in which humans will exist only to be fed upon. Horrified by his intentions, Elizabeth embraces her powers as a Slayer even as she realizes that the greatest danger comes from her own secret desire to yield to Mordred . . . to bare her throat in ecstasy and allow the vampire king to drink deeply of her royal blood.


 It is a well documented fact that England, during the 1500s, faced many foes. The Pope and the Spanish empire were both displeased with the newly appointed Queen Elizabeth. But who would have thought that Queen Elizabeth’s greatest foe would be Mordred, the treacherous son responsible for killing his father—King Arthur—nearly one thousand years before her birth? The Secret History of Elizabeth Tudor, Vampire Slayer manages to entwine a well-loved myth, a small amount of history, and vampires in to a very interesting story.

The story begins shortly after Elizabeth’s coronation ceremony. She has had little time to adjust to the new role she would play, before her two most trusted advisors—Dee and Cecil—insist she visit her mother’s tomb late one evening. With great hesitation, Elizabeth agrees to go with the two men. Once she nears her mother’s tomb, however, she finds herself surrounding by a strange mist and possessing great powers. Little does she know that she has been thrust into the role of vampire slayer. Apparently, she is the direct descendant of Morgaine, the first great Slayer.
           
Shortly after her transformation, Elizabeth is met my Mordred, the vampire King. Mordred was King Arthur’s son and ultimately his greatest enemy. Before King Arthur died in his last battle, Mordred sold his soul to gain enough power to defeat his father; thus, becoming a vampire. Or so the story was told… Now Elizabeth is faced with the responsibility of eliminating the vampire threat to her country.

Elizabeth spends the majority of the novel contemplating God, her faith, and the true definition of evil. She is faced with the daunting task of holding a fragile England together after the reign of her sister Mary ends. To further complicate things, Mordred comes offering eternal life and power, but most importantly peace and protection for the country she loves. If only she could trust him! The story is filled with lies, deceit, and plenty of double-crossing from both parties involved. 
With an incredible eye for detail, Lucy Weston stages her novel in the form of Queen Elizabeth’s private diary. The descriptions and dialogue are vivid and accurate for the time period. Although, at times the details seem dense and overwhelming, which tend to take away from the effect of the novel. The story does, however, offer some thought provoking insight into what might have actually occurred in Queen Elizabeth’s private affairs. Additionally, the constant references to humanity (and lack of) and a person’s faith seem to center around several theological discussions of our time. The characters’ insights and actions could certainly bring questions to the reader’s mind.

Overall, the novel was a “fun”—if not laborious at times—read. If you like love stories with vampires, sabotage, and somewhat graphic love scenes, you should enjoy Elizabeth’s “secret history.”

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Comments

  1. Love your new layout! It's fabulous!

    This book sounds like "eh" to me. I don't like how they are mixing vampires with some classics, but I guess it makes sense to get tweens and teens to read. Great review by the way. Very balanced. :)

    ♥ Trish
    Just a YA Girl

    ReplyDelete
  2. I didn't care for it all that much either. I like historical fiction (and the time period), but this book was too much. I had an ARC and thought I would read it since the Lincoln: Vampire Hunter book was such a hit.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I picked this book up shortly after it came out. The idea was really unique, and I love historical fiction. However, after reading the first couple of pages, I just felt bogged down. Thanks for the review! I makes me feel better that I ended up putting the book down *sheepish grin*

    Btw, I'm a new follower ^_^

    sinn @ sinnful books

    ReplyDelete

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