Skip to main content

The Lost Girl read-along: Week 1

First off, let me start by saying how excited I am that you decided to participate in my first ever read-along. It makes me giddy with anticipation. I always love discussing books as I read them (and after), but it's so hard to find someone to discuss them with!

So, without further ado, lets begin this amazing journey together.


Your homework this week is to read the first 54 pages in Sangu Mandanna's The Lost Girl. Now, if you're like me, you will be sucked away instantly into the story and probably read waaaaaaaaaaay past page 54. That's ok. BUT, you have to promise not to spoil it for those that might not have read ahead. (I am going to practice my own preaching, because I am the worst about dropping hints.)

As you read this week, think about this question:

What power does a name provide, and how does being denied one devalue a person? What does your name mean? If you could choose your own name, what would it be and why?


For week 2, we will be finishing up part 1 of The Lost Girl. I will post the discussion questions next Sunday, so check back then to post! Remember, you get 2 entries in the giveaway for every comment you leave on the blog, plus an additional 1 entry for posting on the Facebook page (LINK HERE). So don't be shy! It doesn't matter when you post either, just as long as it's before we finish the book.

Happy reading!


Week 2 discussion questions here.

Week 3 discussion questions here.

Week 4 discussion questions here.

Comments

  1. I'm going to start this one off because I think my friends are shy. (I am SO calling you out next time!)

    I can't help but be reminded of the Shakespeare quote from Romeo and Juliet, "What's in a name? A rose by any other name would smell as sweet." I know Juliet is arguing that names aren't important, only what things are matters. But I may have to disagree... some. In The Lost Girl, names are important because without one of your own you lack that solidifying element that makes you unique, or at least that's how Eva feels. The moment she picks her name is huge, and it fits her perfectly. She's different--often labled difficult-- and isolated from others, just like the elephant. I also think it's interesting that it's an elephant that Eva picks as a namesake. Elephants often symbolize luck, strength, power and wisdom, all of which easily apply to Amarra/Eva.

    As for my name, I must say I'm pretty happy with it's meaning (even on Urbandictionary.com). It has Irish origins (very fitting) and means "rock, beautiful." I think those that know me best could easily see my stubborness as a rock-like quality. Oddly enough, I always said that I would have picked the name Eva if I had girls (after my name sake). I looked it up and it has Hebrew origins and means life. How perfect for our echo, eh?

    ReplyDelete
  2. If you have not checked out the Facebook page you must! There are some great comments about our read-along posted!

    https://www.facebook.com/TheFlashlightReader/posts/142653619235801?comment_id=264852&ref=notif&notif_t=share_comment

    ReplyDelete
  3. As I started to read Lost Girl, I realized how important a name really is. I mean it surely identifies us as a unique individual and ties to our feelings of self-worth. I immediately felt sorry for Amarra/Eva knowing that her identity is directly tied to a girl who seems so different from her. Although she is connected to this girl Amarra as her echo, she has developed her own unique personality. When she sees the elephant at the zoo isolated in her own pen, you pretty much knew it was a symbol. My heart breaks for her when she thinks "I want to be human so badly it hurts." So by picking her own name as "Eva" she is able to feel like a real human being. How cool that "Eva" means life! It's a step and I wonder what the consequences will be for her. I never really liked my own name...especially since most people pronounce it as "Rachel".:( It means female sheep so not sure what the deeper meaning is there. lol I always liked the name Jacqueline for some reason. However, I have come to accept my name and have selected names for my daughters that I truly love- Sierra, Maya and Alina. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. It quickly becomes apparent while reading 'The Lost Girl' that the narrator is lost not only because she shares a name, but a shadow (or echo)of a life as well. She is treated as less by most of those around her, although they realize her importance more than even she might. A name of her own is an important factor to the story to differentiate her from the original Amarra, especially as she shows signs of breaking free of the constraints her life has bound her with. However, it may not be the safest decision for her to choose her own name, it is an important one for anybody to have their own sense of identity. I am really loving how the author is allowing things to unfold so far.

    As far as my own name, Jaime, it is French for 'I love.' I have not always liked my name, but I do realize the importance it has had to my parents, and I feel I am constantly growing into the meaning behind it. I really would not choose any other name, because I feel I would not be who I am today. The weight of a name comes not only with its historical meaning, but with it personal strengths and definitions as well.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Never thought much about a name being powerful-unless it was something commanding like Messiah perhaps. Not having a name at all, however; is totally different. Am I not worthy? Does it make me less of a person? In the events of this story line I feel the answer is, yes. How is she devalued as a person when she's technically not a person? She's an echo, a copy, she should share the name of her original. In all reality would I want to walk a day in her shoes, no, but this is the hand she has been dealt.

    My name? Well, it means "bright, dawn, or light." Not quite sure that's me, but I wouldn't change my name for any reason. To me the meaning of my given name goes much deeper. I inherited my name from my grandmother, with whom I feel I share quite a few wonderful qualities with. For this reason, a variation of the name has been passed on to my daughter.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Let the world know what you think... leave a message! I read them all!

Popular posts from this blog

Review: The Search for Delicious

The Search for Delicious Natalie Babbitt
Product Details

Reading level: Young Adult
Paperback: 192 pages
Publisher: Square Fish (August 21, 2007)
ISBN-10: 9780312369828
Source: My personal book


Summary from Amazon: Gaylen, the King’s messenger, a skinny boy of twelve, is off to poll the kingdom, traveling from town to farmstead to town on his horse, Marrow. At first it is merely a question of disagreement at the royal castle over which food should stand for Delicious in the new dictionary. But soon it seems that the search for Delicious had better succeed if civil war is to be avoided.


Gaylen’s quest leads him to the woldweller, a wise, 900-year-old creature who lives alone at the precise center of the forest; to Canto, the minstrel who sings him an old song about a mermaid child and who gives him a peculiar good-luck charm; to the underground domain of the dwarfs; and finally to Ardis who might save the kingdom from havoc.

My Review: I love this book! It is such a fun, easy, and enjoyable r…

The Winner's Crime ( Marie Rutkoski)

Book two of the dazzling Winner's Trilogy is a fight to the death as Kestrel risks betrayal of country for love.

The engagement of Lady Kestrel to Valoria’s crown prince means one celebration after another. But to Kestrel it means living in a cage of her own making. As the wedding approaches, she aches to tell Arin the truth about her engagement... if she could only trust him. Yet can she even trust herself? For—unknown to Arin—Kestrel is becoming a skilled practitioner of deceit: an anonymous spy passing information to Herran, and close to uncovering a shocking secret.

As Arin enlists dangerous allies in the struggle to keep his country’s freedom, he can’t fight the suspicion that Kestrel knows more than she shows. In the end, it might not be a dagger in the dark that cuts him open, but the truth. And when that happens, Kestrel and Arin learn just how much their crimes will cost them.





















What is this woman doing to me? I loved The Winner's Curse and didn't know if …

Feature Follow Friday

Feature & Follow is hosted by TWO hosts, Parajunkee’s View & Alison Can Read.    

The goal is to increase blog followers and make friends. Basically how it works is you follow them, they follow you. Win. Win. So looking forward to making new blogging friends & following blogs!


This week's question: Do you have any furry friends?


These are my fur babies: 

This is what it often looks like while I'm busy working. As you can tell, productivity is high. 


This is Lilly waiting for her boys to come home. She'll spend the entire day just like this if she's not sleeping next to me in my office. 

This is Roscoe. AKA The Boss. He runs the show around here. And yes, he has a sweater AND a coat for cold weather.