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Showing posts from September 22, 2013

Interview with Sarah Beth Durst

Have you read Conjured? If not, you need to-- pronto. It's the newest book by Sarah Beth Durst. Author of some of my fave books: Drink, Slay, Love and Vessel.
 (Click the links above to read my reviews of the books)

The lovely Sarah Beth Durst has graciously agreed to stop by for an interview about her newest book, Conjured.


The Book
1.Conjured was like nothing I have read before! It is completely different from your other books. What was it like creating a world full of both benevolent and malevolent magic?
One of the best things about being a writer is being able to play with magic.Beautiful magic.Dangerous magic.I love it all.For Conjured, I was able to explore both sides: Eve can do almost anything, including making the birds in her wallpaper fly around the room, changing the color of her eyes, and flying into the air.But there’s a cost.Every time she uses her magic, she blacks out and experiences terrifying visions of a creepy carnival.
2.What was your favorite scene in the bo…

Mini-Review: The School for Good and Evil (Soman Chainani)

The Deets:
Audience: MG and YA
Pages: 488
Publisher: May 14th 2013 by HarperCollins
ISBN: 9780062104892
Genre: fairy tale, adventure, mystery
Source: library book



This year, best friends Sophie and Agatha are about to discover where all the lost children go: the fabled School for Good & Evil, where ordinary boys and girls are trained to be fairy tale heroes and villains. As the most beautiful girl in Gavaldon, Sophie has dreamed of being kidnapped into an enchanted world her whole life. With her pink dresses, glass slippers, and devotion to good deeds, she knows she’ll earn top marks at the School for Good and graduate a storybook princess. Meanwhile Agatha, with her shapeless black frocks, wicked pet cat, and dislike of nearly everyone, seems a natural fit for the School for Evil.

But when the two girls are swept into the Endless Woods, they find their fortunes reversed—Sophie’s dumped in the School for Evil to take Uglification, Death Curses, and Henchmen Training, whil…

Celebrate Banned Books Week with Jay Asher!

Help spread the word!

Tweet it out: 9/24 @ 3pm EST join #BTGoogleHOA w/ @jayasherguy for #BannedBookWeek-- WIN THIRTEEN REASONS WHY & more http://bit.ly/1aWZCXS

Minute Review: Fairy Tale Comics: Classic Tales Told by Extraordinary Cartoonist

The Deets:
Audience: anyone
Pages: 128
Publisher: September 24th 2013 by First Second
ISBN: 9781596438231
genre: graphic novel, fairy tale
Source: eARC from Netgalley.







From favorites like "Puss in Boots" and "Goldilocks" to obscure gems like "The Boy Who Drew Cats," Fairy Tale Comics has something to offer every reader. Seventeen fairy tales are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by seventeen different cartoonists, including Raina Telgemeier, Brett Helquist, Cherise Harper, and more.





Well this was just fun! It's the perfect combination of graphic novel and fairytale anthology. In this book, you will find the well-known fairytales, but you'll also find a few you might not know about.

For instance, I had never heard of "The Boy Who Drew Cats" or "The Princes and the Tortoise." The stories are well told; they are simple but do not leave out the major elements. I think the format of this book makes each o…

Book Tour and Review: The Snatchabook (Helen and Thomas Docherty)

Where have all the bedtime stories gone?

One dark, dark night in Burrow Down, a rabbit named Eliza Brown found a book and settled down...when a Snatchabook flew into town.

It's bedtime in the woods of Burrow Down, and all the animals are ready for their bedtime story. But books are mysteriously disappearing. Eliza Brown decides to stay awake and catch the book thief. It turns out to be a little creature called the Snatchabook who has no one to read him a bedtime story. All turns out well when the books are returned and the animals take turns reading bedtime stories to the Snatchabook.




The Snatchabook is a delightful story for younger readers. When I read it aloud to my youngest son, we both fell in love with the story. I loved the message and art work; he loved the characters.

The Snatchabook is adorable. It's a cross between a flying squirrel and a fox-- or at least that's what my son thought. In our house, books are a treasure. So when we read a story about books being s…