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Review: Pawn (Aimee Carter)

The Deets:

Audience: YA
Pages: 346
Publisher: November 26th 2013 by Harlequin TEEN
ISBN: 9781848452756
Genre: dystopian, sci-fi
Source: eARC from Netgalley

Pawn (The Blackcoat Rebellion, #1)YOU CAN BE A VII. IF YOU GIVE UP EVERYTHING.

For Kitty Doe, it seems like an easy choice. She can either spend her life as a III in misery, looked down upon by the higher ranks and forced to leave the people she loves, or she can become a VII and join the most powerful family in the country.

If she says yes, Kitty will be Masked—surgically transformed into Lila Hart, the Prime Minister's niece, who died under mysterious circumstances. As a member of the Hart family, she will be famous. She will be adored. And for the first time, she will matter.

There's only one catch. She must also stop the rebellion that Lila secretly fostered, the same one that got her killed …and one Kitty believes in. Faced with threats, conspiracies and a life that's not her own, she must decide which path to choose—and learn how to become more than a pawn in a twisted game she's only beginning to understand.

Aimee Carter strikes again! Pawn was so much more than I expected.

I'll be honest, I wasn't expecting much. I totally judged the book by its cover (which doesn't do much for me). BUT, when I started reading I was hooked.

Aimee Carter is an amazing story teller. A-mazing. I was captivated, and I couldn't pull myself away until I finished.

I love dystopians. I devour them. Reading do many books in the same genre makes it very hard to find something that feels fresh and original. I was worried that Pawn would not be new. I worried for nothing! It was like nothing I have read before. NOTHING. Imagine part Scott Westerfield's The Uglies series with serious spy action. If you can do that, you might have Pawn slightly figured out.

What is so great about this book you might ask? That's a hard one to pin down.

First, the plot is incredible. It's super fast paced, but doesn't feel rushed. It's complicated. You feel torn because your emotions are tested. Who do you hate? Who do you support? Is that guy that's growing on you "good" or is he some dastardly character in disguise?

Then, there is the writing. The dialogue is very witty. Kitty is another great female lead. She's resourceful, but also too quick to make decisions. She's constantly doing things that might not end up so well for her. But that's ok, because she can think on her feet. She's also devoted to the one she loves. As I read, it felt like I was living the scenes. The dialogue was perfectly paced and believable. It didn't feel forced.

Which brings me to another thing I loved about Pawn: the characters. Kitty feels emotions with an intensity that is heart wrenching. She has to watch so many people she cares about suffer, while others live lavishly. She is sick of it all, and ready to take a stand... but where is that going to lead her? The heroes are extra bold, and the villains are sinister. (Think "The Most Dangerous Game" here.) They are also layered more than a Floridian in a snow storm. Every time you think you have one character figured out, there is a twist.

I would be kidding myself if I didn't say I consider The Blackcoat Rebellion series to be "the next big thing" in dystopians. There is going to be a lot of buzz about these books, mark my words. I've already added it to my YA book club list for next year!


  1. ooh I'm so happy to hear that you liked this! I also love dystopias but have being feeling burnt out because so many of them are so similar. But this sounds great. Will definitely check it out soon.

  2. This is the next book on my TBR pile, I can't wait.


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Product Details

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Paperback: 192 pages
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