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Review: The Ghost of Graylock (Dan Poblocki)

The Deets:
Audience: Middle Grades
Pages: 258
Publisher: August 1st 2012 by Scholastic Press
ISBN: 9780545402682
Genre: ghosts, mystery, suspense, paranormal
Source: Library book


The Ghost of GraylockDoes an abandoned asylum hold the key to a frightful haunting?

Everyone's heard the stories about Graylock Hall.

It was meant to be a place of healing - a hospital where children and teenagers with mental disorders would be cared for and perhaps even cured. But something went wrong. Several young patients died under mysterious circumstances. Eventually, the hospital was shut down, the building abandoned and left to rot deep in the woods.

As the new kid in town, Neil Cady wants to see Graylock for himself. Especially since rumor has it that the building is haunted. He's got fresh batteries in his flashlight, a camera to document the adventure, and a new best friend watching his back.

Neil might think he's prepared for what he'll find in the dark and decrepit asylum. But he's certainly not prepared for what follows him home. . . .




This book is awesome! It is everything that a ghost story should be. I am so glad that everyone else in the book club was too chicken to read this one and it fell to me. 

This cover perfectly captures the eeriness of The Ghost of Graylock. The suspense I felt on some pages was intense. My heart raced and my throat felt tight. It was great! I really did not think a middle grades novel could deliver that much suspense. 

Obviously, the majority of the book centers around a ghost story. That story is pretty crazy. The threads slowly unraveled throughout the book. It was a nice, steady unraveling. I didn't figure out the outcome until a few pages before the characters (big perk).  A+ for plot line and creepiness. 

But what I really liked about this book is the emotional haunting Neil faces that flickers just below the surface. There were many issues with his family that he has to come to terms with, and it's not an easy thing to do. He faces many emotions that children from divorced families face, and he handles those emotions with such believability. I was highly impressed. I read another book on the Sunshine State Reader list for this year that boasted a ghost story/coming of age tale. I did not like that book too much. It felt way too busy for my tastes. However, I think The Ghost of Graylock really hit the mark. 




Comments

  1. This sounds really good! And I'm glad it's MG, as I feel like I'm less scared of reading MG ghost stories. :) I hope to pick up a copy soon!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Haha, everyone else chickened out? Like you, I enjoy a good creepy book and the crazier things get-the better.

    Thanks for the review!

    Amber Elise @ Du Livre

    ReplyDelete

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