Bookish Bingo Wrap Up

I had so much fun participating in the Bookish Bingo hosted by Great Imagination. This was the first time I participated and it was GREAT motivation to read through my shelves. I am actually quite proud of myself for finding so many books that I already owned (and have been putting off reading) for this challenge.

Here is how I did:

(links to the reviews of books I read)

A Stand Alone: Some Boys
Sky on the cover:
MC is a LGBTIA: Huntress
Set During Summer:
Pink Cover:
Starts with S,U, M, E or R: Evil Fairies Love Hair
A Thriller: Variant
Set on a Boat:
Asian MC:
A Middle Grade Novel: The Ghost of Graylock
A Series Finale: Of Neptune
A Retelling: Epic Fail
"Storm", "Rain" or "Thunder" in the title:
"July", "August", or September" in Title:
Blue Cover: Burning Blue
A Summer Release: Dream Boy
Strong Sibling Relationships: The Silver Rings
Featuring an Animal Companion: Into the Wild
Set on an Island:
Music or Dance themes: On Pointe
Road Trip: Destined for Doon
Magical Realism: Thin Space
Set in Europe: If I Should Die
Water on Cover: City of Ashes





I came SO close to filling up most of the card. Unfortunately, I started work mid August and it got crazy. I managed to complete 3 rows! I feel like that was pretty awesome for a first attempt. I can't wait to do this again!


Minute Review: The Winter People (Rebekah Purdy)

The Deets: 
Audience: YA
Pages: 320
Publisher: September 2nd 2014 by Entangled: Teen
ISBN: 9781622663682
Genre: fantasy
Source: eARC from Netgalley

The Winter PeopleAn engrossing, complex, romantic fantasy perfect for fans of Kristin Cashore or Maggie Stiefvater, set in a wholly unique world.

Salome Montgomery fears winter—the cold, the snow, the ice, but most of all, the frozen pond she fell through as a child. Haunted by the voices and images of the strange beings that pulled her to safety, she hasn't forgotten their warning to "stay away." For eleven years, she has avoided the winter woods, the pond, and the darkness that lurks nearby. But when failing health takes her grandparents to Arizona, she is left in charge of maintaining their estate. This includes the "special gifts" that must be left at the back of the property.
 


Salome discovers she’s a key player in a world she’s tried for years to avoid. At the center of this world is the strange and beautiful Nevin, who she finds trespassing on her family’s property. Cursed with dark secrets and knowledge of the creatures in the woods, his interactions with Salome take her life in a new direction. A direction where she'll have to decide between her longtime crush Colton, who could cure her fear of winter. Or Nevin who, along with an appointed bodyguard, Gareth, protects her from the darkness that swirls in the snowy backdrop. An evil that, given the chance, will kill her.





This book is both captivating and infuriating at the same time.

The cover drew me in right away. What a gorgeous way to grab my attention! As I started reading, I realized there is a good bit of mystery going on in The Winter People. It's pretty apparent that Salome is different from most kids her age. We are led to believe that it has to do with her fear of winter after a near death experience as a child, but the reader quickly realizes there is more to her story.

That's about where my captivation ended, unfortunately. The annoying qualities of the characters over took anything that I enjoyed. For starters, Salome is annoying. She jumps from one boy to the next without any hesitation. Not cool. I am glad that she realized the manipulation and potential abusive relationship with one boy, but she was the rebound queen. That made her relationships feel trivial, so I had a hard time believing when she found 'the one'. Her best friend wasn't much better. She was just as flighty in a very skanky sort of way. I won't say much about her, but these two girls were not good role models.

But the plot twist in the end did help save the story. It wasn't a surprise but it was delivered well. I did like Salome's choice, so at least I was left with a happy ending.


Review: V is for Villain (Peter Moore)

The Deets:
Audience: older MG (like 8th grade) and YA
Pages:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Genre: superhero fiction
Source: library copy


V is for VillainBrad Baron is used to looking lame compared to his older brother, Blake. Though Brad's basically a genius, Blake is a superhero in the elite Justice Force. And Brad doesn't measure up at his high school, either, where powers like super-strength and flying are the norm. So when Brad makes friends who are more into political action than weight lifting, he's happy to join a new crew-especially since it means spending more time with Layla, a girl who may or may not have a totally illegal, totally secret super-power. And with her help, Brad begins to hone a dangerous new power of his own.

But when they're pulled into a web of nefarious criminals, high-stakes battles, and startling family secrets, Brad must choose which side he's on. And once he does, there's no turning back.


















I live in a house full of boys that are crazy about super heroes. I live and breathe Marvel and DC Comics. I even have Wonder Woman socks. I consider myself well-versed in all things superhero.  While browsing the aisles at Barnes and Noble over the summer, we instantly gravitated to the graphic novels (which are next to the YA section). I refused to buy another graphic novel for my oldest son, so he picked up Hero Worship by Christopher Long; I picked up V is for Villain by Peter Moore... and our superhero reading showdown began. 

 I thought I had a highly original book in my hands when I started V is for Villain. In some respects, I did because every book is unique even when it shares many similarities with another. The story is fun with a likeable narrator. I liked that Brad showed no aptitudes to make him "great"-- or great by hero standards. It was rather funny at times to feel like you were poking a big stick at how small minded some of the characters could be. There was also a pretty major twist at the end that you may or may not see coming, but certainly put things in an interesting light.

But I guess what kind of nagged at me along the way was how similar V is for Villain was to Hero Worship. I seriously doubt it was intentional (Hero Worship came out 5 months before V is for Villain) but it was still obvious at times. In each book you have kids that have special powers that they aren't able to use, a school for developing special powers/heroes, and a corrupt society. Yes, very generic themes but still similar.

Add that to the super annoying footnotes littering the pages and I became a bit frustrated while reading. I cannot begin to say how obnoxious a paragraph long foot note is. Maybe it was supposed to add to the effect of reading Brad's after the big event diary or something. I dunno. It was lost on me.

My son didn't seem interested in V is for Villain at the store, so I never pushed it on him afterwards. It was okay, but not a favorite. I also felt like it was marketed to younger readers but had very mature themes (lots of talk about female anatomy and sex). Both of those would not go over well for my very naive child. Overall, it held my interest for about 2 days, then I found myself rushing to finish before the library's deadline. I was hoping for more, oh well.





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